Power is the number one cost associated with running a data centre facility. It’s also the primary cause of IT infrastructure downtime. That’s why it is such a hugely important factor for organizations looking at potential colocation partners.

As an IT estate grows, so too does the amount of power it consumes. It’s a reality that further enhances the attractiveness of partnering with a colocation provider.

But while many colocation facilities offer swathes of space for infrastructure, and implement rigorous security measures, their power and cooling capabilities sometimes do not meet the mark.

Full Cooling and Power Redundancy

Modern IT hardware needs to be kept at a constant temperature. Also, the humidity levels found within the data centre must remain optimum. Achieving both of these in-house can be a struggle to say the least.

To address this, reputable colocation providers have been constructing custom facilities for many years, and so they understand exactly what is required in terms of power and cooling.

The industrial heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems they utilize represent significant investments. Many organizations realize that they simply cannot entertain implementing in-house solutions.

What’s more, the higher and more robust power-per-square foot ratios found in colocation facilities need to be backed up by suitable redundancies to ensure that absolutely zero downtime occurs because of a power or cooling issue.

Uninterruptible power supplies are utilized in the first instance to provide emergency power in the event of an outage. This allows critical infrastructure to remain online while the colocation provider’s diesel-powered generators are fired up.

Such an approach gives organizations total redundancy and 100% power uptime.

Power Costs Driven By Usage

In the near future, leading colocation providers will be able to help their customers control their costs by only charging them for their actual power consumption. A select few providers are able to provide this feature today.

With an organization’s true cost for power known, an organization can strive to do better going forward. A company that does not understand its power consumption is not in the best position to reduce its usage.

With more and more businesses aware of their power usage, we could see more energy-efficient equipment purchasing and carbon footprints reduced across industries, a reality that will see consumption-based colocation power billing become the norm for many providers.